Ryan Andrew Fry


Moody Bible Institute: Class of 2015
B.A. Biblical Studies
Tyndale Seminary: Class of 2018
M.Div. Interdisciplinary
Pastoral Intern, Chess Teacher, Youth Ministry, Christian Education




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Trinity

There is one, true God (who is eternal, omnipotent, omniscient, invisible, immortal, absolutely incapable of comprehension, infinite in being and in perfection), and He is in essence Spirit, meaning incorporeal, and eternally Triune.

He has always existed as three Persons (Father, Son, and Spirit), and as one in nature, attributes, power, and glory. God possesses life on his own (that is, 'in Himself') and is in need of no one, nor relies on anything else, but manifests his love and glory any ways he so chooses, and has done so in the way understood by Himself to magnify the best possible plan that could ever take place, ultimate perfection.

The New Testament Scriptures describe the Triune nature of God quite casually, very much in passing. It is always assumed and embedded into the very breaths of the words describing God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit. And that is what makes us as the church convinced of its reality, for it is essentially integrated into the entire fabric of the New Testament.

The doctrine of the Trinity distinguishes Christianity from every other religion; and, it is not just to keep it distinct in the marketplace of other options as far as religion opinions; but, the belief in Trinity really does impact the Christians life in a way other religions cannot. The Trinity is an essential part of Christian doctrine, not just some philosophical innecessity.

Following Augustine, who points to the place that says ‘God is love’ in the first letter of John (4:8), God must be triune because love itself is triune. We can infer from this passage then that God must be triune because love itself is triune. Augustine’s argument for the practicality of the Trinity is essentially that all Christian ethics derive from love.

Love requires

1. a beloved,

2. a lover,

3. and the immaterial love that is exchanged between the beloved and the love.

A god such as ‘Allah’ may hypothetically have the potential to love, but cannot actually love until something else comes into being; you could say, “Allah can love”; but, you cannot say “Allah is love.” Our God is love. And such is the basis of our dear fellowship and eternal communion with Him.

This statement has placed in the location it has been (first) within this statement, starting with God, because without knowledge of God, following Calvin, we cannot know ourselves, our own world, or anything else. Doctrinal statements that start with the Scriptures simply are emphasizing the revelation by which we know God. However, I think they overestimate the importance of human epistemology. Next, however, in light of this assertion, we will observe why Christians are sure of these claims.

Using the 1689 London Baptist Confession as a baseline, it reads...


Table of Contents

List of Articles

Cross References

1. Perfect (Matt. 5:48; Ps. 18:30; Heb. 1:13).
2. Eternal (Ps. 90:2; Is. 46:10; 2 Peter 3:8).
3. Unlimited by Space (1 Kgs 8:27; Jer. 23:24).
4. Holy (Job 34:10; Is. 6:1-3; Matt. 5:48).
5. Truthful (Num. 23:19; Rom. 3:4; Heb. 6:18).
6. Gracious (Matt. 5:45; Rom. 3:24; Eph. 2:8-9).
7. Loving (John 3:16; Rom. 5:8).
8. Merciful (Rom. 11:32; Titus 3:5).
9. Righteous (Ps. 119:137; 145:17; Hab. 1:13).
10. Just (Rom. 2:6-8; Rom. 1:18).

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